Sabbath For Yourself

Standard

IMG_3159I usually know when I need to sabbath (or rest). My personality is usually a bit more cynical and I am easily angered. Stress seems to be all around me. It becomes difficult to remember my daily schedule. God is likely a distant thought for me.

Unfortunately, when I know I need a sabbath, it is usually too little too late. When your body tells you to rest, it’s usually because you should’ve rested long ago and now you are running on fumes. Is it any wonder why we see so many health issues among people who are young? They feel like if they stop, then they will fail.

For those in the church world, we tend to ignore the Sabbath because we are “doing God’s work and God never takes a break.” This thought is utter nonsense. Of course God takes a break.

Some equate their love for God with how much work they do for Him. This is disheartening because it loses sight of the Gospel message.

Some believe that the eternity of mankind rests on their shoulders. It must be hard to play God like that…which is why it is probably better that we let God play God.

Most that I know in ministry will say, “I rely on God.” However, that statement proves false unless sabbath happens. Our reliance on God is directly connected to how we sabbath.

We need to get rid of the image that working late from home is a good thing.

We need to get rid of the mindset that turning off our phones could be disastrous.

We need to stop fostering a culture that enables people to become solely dependent upon someone other than God.

We need to stop thinking that the eternal fate of humanity lies on the shoulders of those who work in a church.

We need to learn that it is okay to say no.

We need to learn that the same email will be there tomorrow.

We need to learn that work was never meant to destroy.

We need to learn that martyrdom is not spending all your time working in a church.

We need to know that we aren’t God.

I say that phrase a lot because I have to remind myself of that frequently. This is why I believe it is so important to sabbath for yourself. As a pastor, I can easily succumb to the thought that I am God. Of course, I wouldn’t come right out and say that; otherwise, I would be a heretic. But it is easy to think to yourself: “If I don’t meet with this person, what will he/she do?” Or “If I am not at every single thing this person does, then I am failing as a pastor.” Or “The more I do, the further God’s Kingdom is advanced.” Or “People need to know and I’m the only one who can say it.” Or “I am in charge of their discipleship and I have to be there for them at all times.”

When I begin to think those things, I realize that I think I am God.

If Jesus needed to get away every now and then, why do you think you don’t need it?

If God, after creating the world, decided to rest, then why do you see resting as weakness?

I fear sabbath because I fear the truth about my motivations.

Clear away all of the religious phrasing (doing it all for the Kingdom, running on Jesus, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me, etc.), and I find that I refuse to rest because I fear my motivations. Pastors, just like everyone else, want to leave their mark. They want to be remembered. They want to be the next Billy Graham, Jonathan Edwards, Martin Luther, John Calvin, or Dietrich Bonhoeffer. We can say that we want to impact our community for Christ…but that can often transform into, “Caleb impacted the community for Christ,” or “Caleb’s church impacted the community for Christ.”

Sabbath puts us in our place. Sabbath humbles us. Sabbath reminds us that we are not the most important person in the world. Sabbath forces us to admit that our motivations are not pure. Sabbath tells us that God does not desire a martyr who died because he/she refused to take a break. Sabbath is the truth that in my weakness, Christ is strong. Sabbath points us to community. Sabbath is part of the Kingdom. Sabbath lets God be God.

How about you?

Do you really work as hard as you do to provide a good life for your family? Or are you working as hard as you do because you want to be remembered? Because you want to be successful?

Did you really take that second job to make ends meet? Or did you take that second job because of greed?

Do you refuse to rest because you don’t have time? Or do you refuse to make time because you are fearful of what you might hear from God?

If you take a break, I’m sure the world won’t come crashing down…but if it does, at least you’ll be reminded that God is God and you are not.

Advertisements

Sabbath for God

Standard

When we talk about Sabbath, we rarely think about what it means for God. Usually, we know we need a sabbath when we are exhausted and don’t think we can go much further. Sabbath usually centers around our mental and spiritual health.

We must sabbath for God.

True, God isn’t going to smite you if you refuse to take a break. He isn’t going to get jealous at all the fine work you’re doing by not stopping. God won’t curse you if you work on a Sunday. But I do believe God won’t be in our work if we don’t rest in Him.

If you are anything like me, your idea of rest consists of binge-watching House of Cards on Netflix. Some will delight in their favorite hobby. Others will go out to the golf course. These are all great things (especially House of Cards). It is important to turn your mind off every now and then. But very rarely do we focus on God in those moments. Rarely do we state that we are stopping work to rest in Him. Normally, we stop work because we need a break.

There has to be an intentional focus on God.

When I stop work and rest for God, I notice a change in my behavior.

When I Sabbath for God, I notice:

I renew my covenant with Him…

I find Him in everything I do…

I stop worrying about my job…

I quit using words like relevant, connecting, and other trendy words churches use to build relationships within their community…

When I Sabbath for God, I notice that I have taken control of my life too much and tried to stop God from doing what God wants to do. Rest can remind us that we are tired and worn out, but when we intentionally focus on God during that time, we also see how our work for Him has been far from Him.

Our constant need to control things drives us further from God. So when we rest, we draw nearer to Him. When we rest, we remember that our strength comes from Him. When we rest, we realize how little we can do on our own.

Being in ministry, sometimes the last thing I want to do on my day off is focus on God. I know, that sounds horrible. If we were all honest with ourselves, I think we would see how horrible each of us actually is. The point being, I know it is horrible. I’m not a great person. Usually on my day off, I want to watch all of the television shows I missed during the week, go see a movie, read a new book, take a drive, go to Three Floyds, or clean my apartment. Very rarely do I want to think about God in the midst of all of this. I usually have to force myself to focus on God. The human side of me says just to take a break, but the Spirit in me says to turn my thoughts toward God.

We have to Sabbath for God. God doesn’t need us to do this (even though He did command us to do this). But I think when we Sabbath for God, it reaffirms our covenant with Him. It focuses our misdirected attention back on Him. Our works that were once done in vain are now done with purpose. Weariness is replaced with strength.

When we seek God in our rest, then we will find Him in our work.

Sabbath For Others

Standard

Grunge benchSabbath is a term that goes against much of modern American evangelicalism. Every now and then, there is a book published or a series of blog posts that focuses on this idea. I have read sections in spiritual discipline books that deal with the importance of this practice. However, it still seems to be something that is rarely discussed from the pulpit. I have decided to write a 3-part blog over the practice of Sabbath and its importance in our lives. Today’s post will primarily focus on those in leadership in the American evangelical church. However, I believe the principle still applies to those in any work environment. Since I operate from a limited view, however, I have decided to speak into the context with which I am acquainted.

In the church ministry world, we have convinced ourselves that unless we are behind something, that endeavor will fail. We pat ourselves on the back for working 50, 60, 70+ hours a week on something because we feel we are working tirelessly for the Gospel. In our age of technological advancement, phone calls, emails, and texts are never more than a glance away. Dinners are interrupted by a “ministry crisis.” Conversations with friends are put on hold while an “important phone call” is taken. Even on days off, we feel the need to check on things. This is unhealthy for us (which I will talk about in a different post), but it is also extremely unhealthy for those with whom we work and come into contact.

When we refuse to rest…to Sabbath…others feel lazy if they take a day off, turn off their phone, and/or refuse to check their email. Our example spurs others on to an unhealthy lifestyle.

Sabbath reminds us to trust in God more than in ourselves.

It reminds us that work is not the most important thing we do.

It reminds us that greed is not good.

It reminds us that the world can function if we turn everything off.

Sabbath reminds us that we are not God.

And when we don’t Sabbath, we try to become God.

So what does this mean for others? Why should we rest for others? Because how we live influences others to live in the same way. If we learn how to rest, others around us will feel less stressed. If we turn things off, others around us will begin to understand that many things can wait.

Sabbath is not only important to us, but to others as well. In Exodus 23.12, it reads: “You have six days each week for your ordinary work, but on the seventh day you must stop working. This gives your ox and your donkey a chance to rest. It also allows your slaves and the foreigners living among you to be refreshed.” (NLT)

As leaders, if we don’t rest, then others won’t rest. The principle of this verse applies to today even if the specifics don’t. Leaders are called to Sabbath so that others will Sabbath.

How many stories of ministry burnouts do we need to read before we realize the importance of this practice?

How many heart aching tales of divorce do we need to hear before we begin putting this discipline into practice?

How many health issues do we need to have plague our lives before we understand that our bodies are not made for the stress we endure?

If people around us are showing exhaustion and stress, could it be an indicator that we have not set an example of Sabbath in our own lives? If those we know seem to become more and more needy, could it be because we have not rested as we should have? Sabbath is important for us…but it also reminds others to not look to individuals as God, but to look to God as God. It reminds others that they cannot become God.

Sabbath for others.